Changing CZP Distance

It's important to understand that, unlike PZP, CZP is not intended to be precise (learn more about grid reference points HERE).  The sole purpose of CZP is to speed up the initial zero process by getting shooters close to their personal zero before they start the live-fire process. It's also important to understand that the difference in point of impact (POI) between most standard zero distances is minimal in terms of sight adjustment.  As an example, for an M4 there's roughly a 2 MOA difference in POI between 100m and 200m and another 2 MOA difference between 200m and 300m. So, if you zero at a distance other than the one your collimator is calibrated for... no big deal- you will just have to make a few extra clicks of elevation adjustment. 

That said, it still makes sense to get shooters as close as possible to personal zero before we start shooting. So, if you want to establish zero at a distance other than the distance your collimator is set up for, you simply adjust point of aim on the collimator grid. 

The Simple, Rough Method

For infantry weapons (M4, M16, MK18, etc) and machine guns, this quick, easy method is what we recommend:

  1. Adjust point of aim (POA) to CZP on the collimator grid. We find that starting here produces better final results.
  2. Move POA downward on the collimator grid to zero at a distance further than the one your collimator is calibrated to.
  3. Move POA upward on the collimator grid to zero at a distance closer than the one your collimator is calibrated to.
  4. Adjustments should generally be small. Our range adjustment diagram provides a good visual representation of the magnitude of the adjustments needed (even though the grid might be different than the one you're using).
  5. Note the number of clicks that you move your sight(s). When you conduct live fire zero, note whether initial shot groups are (consistently) high or low. If so, modify your adjustment from CZP appropriately the next time you use the collimator.    

Being More Precise

If you have a weapon with a magnified optic, you may want to be more precise with your CZP range adjustment (especially if that weapon uses expensive ammo). To get a better starting point:

  1. Identify the difference between POI for the zero distance your collimator is calibrated for and the one you actually want to use.
  2. Convert the difference in POI to MILS (or MOA if you want to count clicks on an MOA-graduated sight rather than using the collimator grid). For example, if the difference in point of impact at 100m between a 100m zero and a 200m zero is 1 inch, then the POI difference is approximately 1 MOA = 0.3 MILS.
  3. Identify the graduation of the grid in your collimator. For most Sniper Weapon Collimators in the US, the small squares are 0.2 MILS. 
  4. Adjust point of aim (POA) to CZP on the collimator grid. 
  5. Move POA downward the appropriate number of squares on the collimator grid to zero at a distance further than the one your collimator is calibrated to. If, for example, you are changing from 100m to 200m and the difference in POI is 0.3 MILS, then move POA 1.5 squares downward on the grid.
  6. Move POA upward the appropriate number of squares on the collimator grid to zero at a distance closer than the one your collimator is calibrated to.  
  7. Alternately, you can count clicks on your sight's elevation turret. Using the example above, 1 inch = 1 MOA = 4 clicks. You can use the collimator grid to confirm that you're adjusting in the right direction. 
  8. Note the number of clicks that you move your sight(s). When you conduct live fire zero, note whether initial shot groups are (consistently) high or low. If so, modify your adjustment from CZP appropriately the next time you use the collimator.  

 


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